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Filipino Students Develop Gloves That Translate Sign Language Into Speech

Filipino Students Develop Gloves That Translate Sign Language Into Speech

FreebieMNL - Filipino Students Develop Gloves That Translate Sign Language Into Speech

It’s the future of sign language!

For their thesis project, Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges students have developed “trainable gloves that can interpret Filipino sign language and convert it into speech.”

In a video posted on Facebook, the group members demonstrated how the gloves operated. They also gave some background as to what concepts led to the creation of their project.

FreebieMNL - Filipino Students Develop Gloves That Translate Sign Language Into Speech
Filipino students showing off their innovative gloves
Photo from Francis Anthony de Guzman/Facebook

“This project gives [a] voice to the deaf and speech-impaired people,” one group member said. “With this, the communication barrier could be lessened allowing the deaf and speech-impaired people to express themselves and give them opportunities to grow in their respective careers.”

This isn’t the first time that young minds have come together for the hearing impaired.

In 2016, Thomas Pryor and Navid Azodi, two college students from the University of Washington in Seattle, came up with a similar device. They won a $10,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for SignAloud, a pair of gloves that can understand and interpret the hand gestures of American Sign Language, or ASL.

Thomas Pryor and Navid Azodi with their SignAloud gloves
Photo from Daniel Kim

The duo sought to break down the language barriers that existed for those who were hard of hearing or hearing impaired. “Our purpose for developing these gloves was to provide an easy-to-use bridge between native speakers of American Sign Language and the rest of the world,” Azodi said in a statement.

Texas A&M University also thought of a type of wearable device that converts sign language into English by sensing the user’s movements. In addition, researchers in China have previously utilized the motion-sensing equipment of Microsoft’s Kinect to translate Chinese Sign Language into spoken and written words.

It seems that technology has been catching up to provide modern and innovative solutions for disabled people around the world. For now, we’re proud that our own special group of Pinoys were able to add on to these achievements and provide a solution for disabled Filipinos.

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