Wellness

Introverts Find it Harder to Cope in a Pandemic

Introverts Find it Harder to Cope in a Pandemic

sad isolated young woman looking away through fence with hope

The pandemic hasn’t been easy for anyone and it’s understandable why people would assume introverts are living the dream in quarantine. They’re usually homebodies, prefer limited contact with others, and don’t have to awkwardly turn down plans. Yet studies show they might find it harder to cope during these uncertain times compared to their extroverted friends.

Why Introverts are Struggling

The initial months of quarantine were not so bad for introverts, but pro-longed isolation eventually took a toll on them. “Higher introversion was associated with higher loneliness, depression, and anxiety,” according to the findings of The University of Wollongong’s School of Psychology. This is because they won’t reach out to others for help and often keep to themselves when going through something.  

How Extroverts are Thriving

While everyone tried to keep 6 feet apart from each other, extroverts continued communicating albeit virtually. Instead of hanging out with friends or visiting loved ones, they took advantage of social media platforms and online networks. Professor of Personality Psychology Christopher Soto explains that this factors into how they’re able to thrive even when extroverts are stuck at home.

people in a video call
Photo by EKATERINA BOLOVTSOVA on Pexels.com

Coping Strategies During the Pandemic

Although a study published by the American Psychological Association suggests that introverts pace themselves. Deliberately engaging in extroverted behavior may benefit them but scheduling consecutive zoom meetings or catch-ups would be too overwhelming. Set a limit for the length of calls and have structured days that include time to pursue interests to avoid feeling fatigued.

person holding white stylus
Photo by Jess Bailey Designs on Pexels.com

The resiliency of extroverts may be helping them deal better, but neither personality types are immune to mental health issues. Many people have been using their downtime as an opportunity to focus on themselves and building stronger, more meaningful relationships. If you’re an introvert living with an extrovert or vice versa, openly talk about each other’s needs and come to a compromise.  

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